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THE LOVE TRAIN

Theater Ink by John Rowell

Beware Lisa! She’s a fiery sexpot who happens to be infatuated with trains, which leads a young man to chase her through the underground labyrinth of New York City’s subway tunnels—but can he keep dodging the third rail?! Meanwhile, two of their other friends, Martin and Jennifer, explore their own electricity through their obsession with the Yankees. Late arrivals, missed connections, and everyday people in extraordinary circumstances: are they willing to travel to the end of line for love? Subway riders and train passengers of all sorts are sure to tap into Paul Bomba’s The Man Under, which receives its World Premiere production at 59E59 Theaters beginning January 25, under the direction of Benjamin Kamine, and continuing through February 17. For more info, visit www.59e59.org.

RED, THE BLOOD OF ANGRY MEN: Yes, Les Miserables is on everybody’s mind again during these hectic “awards season” days, which is probably a good harbinger for Capolavori Productions Inc.’s new stage adaptation of another classic French novel, Stendahl’s The Red And The Black, which begins performances January 18 at The Theatre at St. Clement’s. Set in a small village near the French Alps in 1828, at the height of the royalist restoration, the play concentrates on a tempestuous time in the life of a 19-year-old Latin scholar, whose job as tutor to the mayor’s sons suddenly becomes a slippery slope when he enters into a liaison dangereuse with the mayor’s wife. Oo-la-lah, indeed. Deloss Brown is the adapter and director; opening night is set for January 23. www.TheRedAndTheBlackThePlay.com.

A HAPPENING IN MIDTOWN: Attention, scribes! The Midtown International Theatre Festival, which has been boldly ratcheting up on the New York theater radar screen in the last few years, continues to seek submissions for its fourteenth season (July 15-August 4.) The Festival accepts submissions in all genres—any sort of stage play, musical or otherwise, new or revived, mainstream or focused on an ethnic or cultural niche. And to be eligible, each show must have a producer and production team attached to the project. Deadline for submissions is January 21. Submit, submit! For more information, visit www.MidtownFestival.org.

CONCERTIZING: And speaking of scribes, the Dramatists Guild Fund, the public charity arm of the Dramatists Guild of America, is set to stage a whopper of a concert to launch the Directory of Contemporary Theatre Writers website on Monday, January 21 at Second Stage Theatre. What is the Directory, you ask? Well, it’s an exhaustive resource for anyone interested in our current musical theatre’s vast wealth of contemporary composers and lyricists, and offers direct access to 150 musical theater writers whose mostly unpublished or self-published songs comprise a treasure of opportunity for teachers, performers, students and anyone looking for new and exciting musical audition material. The Concert, which is directed by Laura Josepher, music directed by Matt Castle, and hosted by Seth Rudetsky, will highlight 19 songs by 26 of The Directory’s writers, whose work will be sung by some of the theater’s most esteemed musical artists. Not to be missed, and a portion of the evening’s proceeds will, of course, go to the DGF. For more information, visit the website www.contemporarymusicaltheatre.com.

 OH, THE DRAMA! Outside of the New York theater world, where is the most honest-to-goodness drama to be found? Why, in any American high school, of course, where drama lives! (I mean, how many teenagers have you spent time with, lately? Hello?!) And that’s especially true of the drama club, where high-schoolers not only participate in on-stage dramatics but also go through all sorts of drama just in being a part of the play. I know you know what I’m talking about here, and that relatability factor should propel Brian Bauman’s new play A Crucible, which follows the drama club at “Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception” High School as it sets out to stage Arthur Miller’s classic play The Crucible. Conflicts erupt when ideas about sexuality and contemporary performance begin to influence the young performers and their approach to the production. Kate Gagnon directs, and the show opens January 13 at The Wild Project as a production of Perfect Disgrace Theater. For more info, visit www.perfectdisgrace.com.

OH, THE DRAMA! Outside of the New York theater world, where is the most honest-to-goodness drama to be found? Why, in any American high school, of course, where drama lives! (I mean, how many teenagers have you spent time with, lately? Hello?!) And that’s especially true of the drama club, where high-schoolers not only participate in on-stage dramatics but also go through all sorts of drama just in being a part of the play. I know you know what I’m talking about here, and that relatability factor should propel Brian Bauman’s new play A Crucible, which follows the drama club at “Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception” High School as it sets out to stage Arthur Miller’s classic play The Crucible. Conflicts erupt when ideas about sexuality and contemporary performance begin to influence the young performers and their approach to the production. Kate Gagnon directs, and the show opens January 13 at The Wild Project as a production of Perfect Disgrace Theater. For more info, visit www.perfectdisgrace.com.

 
 
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